{ "bwmArticle1": { "articlelang": "English", "articleHeader": { "articleTitle": " It's Not My Fault: The Reality of Group Evil ", "articleIdx": 1232112, "articlequalification": "latestNews", "articleMainImage": "img/NicoleAevil.jpg" }, "articleBody": { "articleContent": "

To create Edgar Prince, the villain in eHuman Dawn, I had to dive deep into the shadows of the mind and psyche and do some serious research on phenomena called evil. As I began work on the sequel, it became clear that to understand him better, and the world he has created, I needed to go further, and face that shadow directly within my own life and the world around me. As I surface from this journey, I've discovered something very important: One evil man does not make an evil world. We may follow him and make him our leader, (see my blog on psychopaths) but he can't be effective unless his orders are carried out by many individuals, and rarely do the orders seem purposefully evil. Instead, they often make sense from a group perspective, even if they actually cause great harm to others.

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I believe in humanity and the future. I believe that our science can and will unlock secrets needed for long life and a cleaner planet. But there's also this part of me that cautions, reminding me to look at who's offering the technology before 'Jumping' into it, as the process for uploading the consciousness into an eHuman body is called in my novel. In the short term, it solves the problem of death, but who will make sure the mechanized body lives forever? Who guarantees the quality of life in a programmable world?

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To give our lives to technology is to give them to those who own the technology.

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I cannot escape this basic truth. Do I trust those who run our corporations and governments? For those who've read eHuman Dawn, the answer is clear: No I don't. I can't because at every turn I see evidence of evil enacted on this planet in the name of the corporate profits and government sovereignty: Wars funded to protect corporate mining interests, children forced to work for no money to make cheap clothing, rain forests destroyed to raise the beef that fuels our fast food industry, ecosystems obliterated for profits and stock markets manipulated for billion dollar bonuses. This is just a small list of the ways our businesses and governments harm humanity everyday. The tendency towards group evil is far greater than the percentage of individual psychopaths in the world.

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Why is this? Why are evil policies easily enacted on behalf of the group? In his profound book, 'The People of The Lie,' author Scott Peck, MD, makes the following observation:

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'For many years it has seemed to me that human groups tend to behave in much the same ways as human individuals - except at a level that is much more primitive and immature than one might expect...Of one thing I am certain, however: that there is more than one right answer…this is to say that it is the result of multiple causes. One of those causes is the problem of specialization.'

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Dr. Peck goes on to explain that while specialization is the reason for groups to even exist, we can get more done together than we can alone, it is also a main reason groups are capable of evil. This is because of what Dr. Peck calls, 'fragmentation of consciousness.'

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'Whenever the roles of individuals within groups become specialized, it becomes both possible and easy for the individual to pass the moral buck to some other part of the group…we will see this fragmentation time and time again…The plain fact of the matter is that any group will remain inevitably potentially conscienceless and evil until such a time as each and every individual holds himself or herself directly responsible for the behavior of the whole group - the organism - of which he or she is a part. We have not begun to arrive at that point.'

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Thus, when asked why annual inspections were not done on an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, the person in charge of said inspections might say, 'I was told to stop doing them by my boss.' When the boss is asked, he may answer, 'Corporate put a hold on all inspections until further notice.' Keep going up the ladder and you find yourself in the CEO's office, the one who should be responsible. But what will he say? Dr. Peck imagines an answer something like, 'My actions may not seem entirely ethical, but I had to cut expenses. After all, I must be responsible to the stockholders you know. On their account I must be directed to the profit motive.'

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Who then decides what actions any group will take? The small investor who has no clue how the operation even works? The mutual fund owners? If so, which mutual fund? Which broker?

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Who is ultimately responsible for the actions of the group?

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In this light, it becomes clear that groups are immature, and in great danger of being morally bankrupt. Since over 90% of people work for an organization, most of us are in danger of passing the moral buck when it comes to our work. Add to this the fact that the majority of people would rather follow than lead, thus allowing a power vacuum that psychopaths can and often do fill, and we have an environment ripe for manipulation and exploitation. We are all part of the problem, whether we like it or not.

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It worries me how easy it would be for the world of eHuman Dawn to become a reality. I don't trust the Edgar Princes, nor the Guardian Enterprises of this world, to enable technological immortality for the love of humanity. Yet, I don't believe that halting progress is the solution. There's so much yet to discover about our humanity, and the connections between our bodies, minds and the planet.

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Instead of fearing technological innovation, we each need to become responsible, right here and now, for the organizations in which we live and work. Each and every one of us must stop passing the moral buck and become worthy of the technology we're creating. This is the great work that the future requires from us, if we're going to live in a world of personal liberty and freedom for all.

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Whether or not your job produces technology doesn't matter. Every organization runs the risk of passing the moral buck in some way, thus creating a mentality that the evil that surrounds us isn't our fault. Each of us has the opportunity to change that group dynamic, and create mature work places and organizations that honor humanity as a whole.

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The alternative could be nothing less than the complete technocratic rule of the few over the many. I think we can do better than that.

", "articleAddons": "abc" }, "articleFooter": { "authorData": { "authorAvatar": "img/NicoleA.jpg", "articleAuthorName": "Nicole Anderson", "authorBio": "Nicole Sallak Anderson is a Computer Science graduate from Purdue University. After graduation, she developed encryption and network security software, which inspired both the storyline and the science behind eHuman Dawn. She currently lives with her husband and two teenaged sons on two acres in the Santa Cruz mountains of Northern California, where she indulges in a variety of homesteading hobbies, from beekeeping and raising chickens and goats, to gardening, canning, spinning, and knitting.", "authorId": 12345, "authorContact": "Twitter:@NSallakAnderson ", "authorWebsite": " ehumandawn.blogspot.com ", "articleAuthorDonate": { "donationBTC": "1Bj81oH248xxRfyhh7VrMMV3UVpxhrD6Kw", "donationLTC": "LbzZj1AvtUfYFPwaCy8Phb2DRsyujSSr6i", "donationDoge": "DG9ckXLXq8Swurrm556eQDBmBBgD4VezwC", "donationUltracoin": "UZ3dTp8NBnUhGLmFYfJpyDd28ci5jSVDZp" } }, "articleTags": { "tag1": "science", "tag2": "technology", "tag3": " freedom of thought", "tag4": "future", "tag5": "liberty" }, "articleCategory": "News", "articleCommentsCount": "Comments:56" } }, "bwmArticle3": { "articlelang": "English", "articleHeader": { "articleTitle": " Why You Should Probably Be Using a MultiSig Bitcoin Wallet ", "articleIdx": 1232112, "articlequalification": "latestNews", "articleMainImage": "img/pw1b-01.png" }, "articleBody": { "articleContent": "

I would say I'm generally a jovial person, but if I woke up and realized I'd lost 7,500 bitcoins, I would encourage the rest of the world to back away slowly without making any sudden movements. Fortunately for the public good this hasn't happened to me, but it did happen to an unfortunate fellow named Jeremy Howells. He became semi notorious in the bitcoin community for accidentally disposing of his hard drive with the keys to all his bitcoins on it.

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We're still in the early stages of bitcoin's life cycle, and five years is like the blink of an eye in currency-years. There is a strong trend toward mass adoption (5 million wallets growing 8x year over year, according to Mary Meeker's annual report), but we're not there yet. As things currently stand, there's a fundamental disconnect in usability and control. You can choose to keep your private keys yourself in what is known as a client-side wallet, or you can hand them over to another party which stores them for you in a web wallet. When you do the latter, you're trusting that they are taking appropriate security measures, and keeping at least the majority of your bitcoins in cold storage. Unfortunately, Mt. Gox and other recent fiascos prove that this isn't always the case, which is why the safest thing to do is probably to diversify your holdings by using a variety of wallets so if one gets hacked, you don't lose everything.

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You probably like things to be easy; most people do. Many users simply don't want the headache of thinking about security, which is the appeal of a full-service solution that stores your private keys for you. The issue is problematic for more advanced or tech-savvy users, who generally want a heightened degree of security without sacrificing the ability to keep control of their assets.

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Conveniently enough, the Bitcoin protocol can accommodate such a tall order. Pay to Script Hash (P2SH) is a type of bitcoin address that was introduced as part of Bitcoin Improvement Proposal 16 (also known as BIP 16), as of early 2012. P2SH addresses can be secured using a more complex algorithm than standard addresses and involve the use of multiple Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (more commonly known as ECDSA) keys, rather than only one.

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Multi signature wallets allow users to maintain direct control over their bitcoins while also removing some of the security burden from them. In the event that one of their private keys is lost or stolen, it's no longer a catastrophe. The concept in m-of-n signature schemes is fairly simple, at least at an abstract level--in order to complete a transaction, more than one private key (m) is needed out of a total number generated (n). In a 2-of-3 scenario, you would need two out of a total of three keys to withdraw money, but the process for deposits is the same as it would be for a standard address. You can then approach distributing and storing the keys in various ways. You could hold one key, you could give one (the backup) to a trusted friend or relative, or even store it yourself in a different location from the \"main\" key, and the third key would be held by yet another party, such as the company offering the service. BitGo is at the forefront of implementing multisig addresses, so I recommend you check them out.

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It's significantly harder for someone to steal two private keys than one, which adds an additional safety net against theft, both physical and digital. It's more secure than a traditional digital signature setup, and it also offers more protection from human error. If I accidentally go into spring cleaning overdrive and toss out my hard drive with my private keys on it, I can still access my bitcoins using the backup key.

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The reason I like multi signature addresses and wallets is that unlike having a vault that is simply insured, they use technology to secure the coins. It's an actual advancement in the protocol that permits this type of address to be created and used. Insurance does not actually solve the problem of loss or theft-- it merely corrects the wrong after the fact. It's more bandaid than preventative care. It does not offer an advance in technology, as the burden falls on the insurance company; there's no real gain over insuring a gold ingot, for example. I have no doubt that insurance covering bitcoin assets will become industry standard in the next few years, but if bitcoin ends up requiring all the same cumbersome financial infrastructure as the current system, we will have gone full circle while making little real progress.

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I've really only looked at the application of multisignature transactions and wallets for security purposes here, but they can also be applied to escrow and transactions involving digital payment for physical goods. They can also be used in institutional or company settings, where more than one person is needed to sign off on something before funds can be released, for instance. The other applications deserve their own post so I'll address them at a later date.

\n ", "articleAddons": "abc" }, "articleFooter": { "authorData": { "authorAvatar": "img/Ariannafoto.jpeg", "articleAuthorName": "Arianna Simpson", "authorBio": "As a Bitcoin enthusiast and investor, She is particularly passionate about helping women get involved in the Bitcoin community. She is now at Facebook working out of the New York office, where She organizes the Bitcoin meetup group. In her previous lives, She did ecology research for the National Science Foundation in South Africa, co-founded Tigervine, lead sales & boutique operations at Shoptiques.com, and spent several months backpacking through southern Africa. On those rare occasions when I’m not thinking about Bitcoin, I enjoy riding my motorcycle and traveling as much as possible.", "autorId": 123456, "authorContact": "Twitter @AriannaSimpson ", "authorWebsite": " ariannasimpson.com ", "articleAuthorDonate": { "donationBTC": "1Bj81oH248xxRfyhh7VrMMV3UVpxhrD6Kw", "donationLTC": "LbzZj1AvtUfYFPwaCy8Phb2DRsyujSSr6i", "donationDoge": "DG9ckXLXq8Swurrm556eQDBmBBgD4VezwC", "donationUltracoin": "UZ3dTp8NBnUhGLmFYfJpyDd28ci5jSVDZp" } }, "articleTags": { "tag1": "multisig bitcoin wallet", "tag2": "technology", "tag3": " security", "tag4": "bitcoin protocol", "tag5": "cold storage" }, "articleCategory": "News", "articleCommentsCount": "Comments:56" } } }